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Want Social Media Fame in 2014? That’ll cost you $6800, please.

According to a recent Forbes article, if you feel the need to “enhance” your social media presence in the New Year, all you need to do is hand over a mere seven grand. So what exactly will this money buy you? Well for starters, how does a million YouTube views, a million Twitter followers, 20,000 likes on Facebook and an enviable amount of Instagram and Pinterest followers sound? So what’s the catch?
 
Read more to find out why the cost of social media “fake fame” isn’t so fabulous after all.
 

RCC Blog: Young Professionals' Corner

Ways to Improve Your Social Media Etiquette

There is a fine line when determining what is deemed appropriate vs. inappropriate in the digital media realm. Using social media can positively enhance your personal brand or be consequently detrimental to it. Whether it is through Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, LinkedIn or even Pinterest, social media etiquette should always be taken into consideration.

Facebook: Face your problems, don’t Facebook them. Quite frankly, no one cares that you got a paper cut and it hurts or that all your friends have the latest iPhone, but you don’t. Also, please don’t spam your friends’ inboxes with multiple event invitations a day. Not only is it obnoxious, it’s inconsiderate as well.

Twitter: Do hashtag, but don’t over-hashtag. A #hashtag can be a very effective tool for stirring up a particular topic of conversation or creating some kind of buzz. It’s a great way to categorize your tweets into a grouped discussion or “digital community”. However, putting too many hashtags in a post or hashtagging nonsense words like #YoloSwag (yes… people do tweet this), can be extremely annoying and even confusing for your followers.

Instagram: You don’t need to share every single photo taken on your phone. There’s nothing more tasteless than filling up someone’s photo feed with pointless images of the apple you had for breakfast or the traffic you encountered on the morning commute to work. Do “like” other people’s photos. They will more than likely return the favor.

LinkedIn: Remember, this is a professional social networking forum. With that being said, it’s different than your other social media profiles in the sense that you don’t need to add and accept random connection requests. Endorsing your connections for various skills and expertise is a plus; however, don’t feel obliged to endorse someone simply because you know them. 

Pinterest: Try and avoid uncategorized pinning. If I’m following your “Sweets and Treats” board and you’re pinning images of home décor, I will more than likely un-follow your mishmash board. Re-pinning images is two big thumbs up, but when you do, make sure you re-pin from the original source as a way to credit the reference.

Social media has blown up in the last decade and it is continuing to expand every day. Since you more than likely have joined one or more of the listed social media forums, it is vital that you take these etiquette tips into consideration to maintain a respected and valued online persona.

RCC Blog: Young Professionals' Corner

What is the deal with thank-you notes?

A thank-you note is one of the most effective tools to get you to stand out in a pack of job candidates, especially if you all share similar qualifications. While writing a thank-you note only takes a few short moments, the people who really want to make a great impression actually take the time to write one after an interview.

In many cases, employers tend to favor those who mail in a hand-written thank-you card. For new college grads particularly, sending a thank-you note after an interview not only shows your dedication and interest for the job, it also illustrates a profound level of professionalism on your behalf.

And when I say take the time to write a thank-you note, that doesn’t translate to typing it out and sending it in an email.

In most cases, what happens when someone receives an email? They skim through it in seconds and with the simple click of a button, it’s placed in their delete folder, gone forever. Sure, send a short email right after, but always follow up with a hand-written card—no matter how ugly your handwriting may be.

In contrast, what generally happens when someone receives a note or card in the mail? They take the time to feel the material of the paper, to analyze the writing, to fully engage in the letter, and often times, it will end up on the person’s desk or bulletin board, not in some trashcan or paper shredder.

So, what’s the big deal with thank-you notes? For one, it’s the polite thing to do. Also, it’s an extremely effective device used to make one stand out from the crowd. Lastly, it shows that you are willing to go the extra mile in everything you do.

 

Drumroll please… YouTube names the top ten videos of 2013

It appears that people around the world all want to know one burning question… what does the fox say. You heard me right; the number one viral video of the year is “What Does the Fox Say?” by Ylvis, a comedy group of two brothers from Norway. In just over a three-month span, the clip has racked up nearly 300,000,000 million views! What’s even more mind blowing is that the media mogul, YouTube has seen a 50 percent increase in traffic flow from 2012 with over 6 billion hours of video watched each month.* Video courtesy of YouTube

Read more to see which other trending videos made the top ten cut according to YouTube.

* http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/11/top-youtube-videos-2013_n_4426047.html